Saturday, September 23, 2017

Linux for Serious Photography

This post comes from Scribbles and Snaps blog, so be sure to check out the original post here! 

Linux Tools For Serious Photographers

While most mainstream Linux distros come with photo management software, these applications are more suited for shutterbugs than serious amateurs and professional photographers. Fortunately, there are quite a few high-quality powerful Linux-based photographic tools that can rival proprietary commercial applications like Adobe Photoshop Elements and Lightroom. And using applications like Entangle, Rapid Photo Downloader, and digiKam, you can turn your Linux machine into a powerful darkroom for processing and organizing photos.

Common Photographic Tasks

Let’s start with a brief overview of common photographic tasks:

  • While you’d normally use your camera to take photos, there are a couple of Linux-based tools that can be used to remotely control and trigger your camera. These tools can come in handy for exposure bracketing, focus stacking, macro photography, and so on.
  • Before you can do anything with your photos, you need to transfer them from your camera to a computer, and then import them into the photo management application.
  • Next, you have to sort and organize the imported photos.
  • Once the photos have been neatly organized, you have to process the RAW files.
  • Most of us share our photographic masterpieces with others. And in most cases, we publish photos using either one of many third-party photo sharing services, or upload photos to self-hosted galleries.

So what are the tools that can help you to handle these photographic tasks on Linux?

digiKam to Rule Them All

A solid photographic workflow is unthinkable without an application that can help you to import, process, and organize photos. While there are several such applications available on Linux (RawstudioDarktableRawTherapee, etc.), digiKam makes a sensible choice for a number of reasons.

  • Thanks to the LibRaw decoding and processing library, digiKam can handle a wide range of RAW formats. digiKam currently supports more than 400 cameras that shoot in RAW, and new models are added almost as soon as they hit the market.
  • digiKam offers several ways to view your photos. You can use a conventional album view, browse photos by tags or by date, or display your photos as a timeline. digiKam also allows you to view your photos on the map, provided they have been properly geotagged.
  • Speaking of geotagging, the application sports a separate interface for working with geographical data. You can use it not only to geotag photos, but also geocorrelate them. digiKam offers another useful feature called reverse geocoding. Using it, you can retrieve human-readable locations such as city, street, country, etc. for photos based on their geographical coordinates.
  • The photo management application offers a wide array of tools that can help you to keep tabs on your photos. For example, digiKam offers tagging and rating features. In addition to that, the application sports the Color labels and Picks tools. The former lets you apply color codes to photos, while the latter can come in handy for quickly sorting photos.
  • digiKam sports powerful filtering and search capabilities. The dedicated Filters sidebar in digiKam offers a simple yet flexible way to filter photos by specific criteria. For example, you can easily set up a filter that displays photos containing certain tags and have a specific color label.
  • The application supports non-destructive editing and versioning. This allows you to tweak photos without affecting their originals. In addition to that, you can save multiple modified versions of the same original and use digiKam to neatly organize them as well as keep track of changes made to each version.
  • When it comes to editing, digiKam offers a wide selection of useful tools. Besides the usual suspects like Curve and Level adjustment tools, digiKam offers exposure blending, lens correction, perspective adjustment, black-and-white conversion, and many other nifty features. Better yet, the application sports powerful batch processing capabilities which allow you to apply multiple editing and conversion operations on a set of photos.
  • Finally, thanks to a comprehensive collection of bundled plugins, you can publish your photos on many popular photo sharing services like Flickr, Picasa, Facebook, SmugMug, and others.

Read More here!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Learn more about RAW photography with this book!



from WordPress http://ift.tt/2xZvZtw
via IFTTT

Friday, September 22, 2017

Create a VHS Movie Effect with Vegas Movie Studio

This is a tutorial I made a while back about creating a VHS effect using Vegas. Vegas is a great affordable movie editor for Windows.

It used to be owned by Sony, but recently was purchased by Magix. It’s still the same great editor and this technique will still work. With the popularity of Synthwave, and the never ending 80s nostalgia, a lot of people have been living this tutorial. I’m glad it was able to help som e people.

If you don’t have Vegas, you can use the link above to get a copy for yourself.



from WordPress http://ift.tt/2yuSJ1M
via IFTTT

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Synchronizing External Audio With Video in Kdenlive

A lot of people think you need a camera with an external microphone input, but this really is not the case. Using this lapel microphone for smart phone, you can have high quality, clear audio on any video no matter how far away you are from the camera. There’s no need to have a camera with an external mic input, you can get just as good results, or better by synchronizing audio recorded on your smart phone to your video recorded on any camera. All of this is done in post production. In this video I demonstrate the technique, as well as walk you through the process of doing it yourself.
If you’re interested in the exact camera I’m using, you can get them for much less than a DSLR here.



from WordPress http://ift.tt/2xxT4CK
via IFTTT

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Sonicake Cloud Chorus – The Best Chorus Pedal for Under $60?

In this video I unbox, test, and review the Cloud Chorus by Sonicake. It’s a small footprint, true bypass, chorus pedal that sounds pretty great! Pick up one of these for yourself here. For about $50, Sonicake makes an extremely high quality guitar fx pedal. It’s built in a high quality metal box, features a metal toggle switch for intensity, level and depth controls, as well as a big knob for speed.

Overall I think the pedal is very nice. It has a nice vintage type tone and can go from subtle to crazily intense chorus. Watch the video above for a sound test. I look forward to more good stuff from this Sonicake!



from WordPress http://ift.tt/2xeCdoH
via IFTTT

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

The Vintage Digital Sound Of The Zoom PS04

The Zoom PS04 is not a new recorder by any means, it came out about 10 years ago. However, this little handheld digital 4 track is still one of my favorite pieces of recording equipment I’ve ever owned. I like it so much, I actually bought a second one in case the main one I use ever breaks I’ll have a back up.

There’s some weird quirks to them, like recording on Smart Media Cards, which are getting harder and harder to find, and had a maximum size of 128mb. However, a 128mb card is enough space to be productive and record several songs with virtual takes.

However, there is a certain sound quality they possess that seems to be unlike any other multitrack recorder I’ve heard. They have that gritty, early digital recording sound. Almost like 12 bit samplers like the Akai s900. Even though they are 16 bit, the sample rate isn’t quite CD quality, at it’s highest setting it is 31250hz. I believe this has something to do with the sound quality, but even if I convert sounds on a computer to 31250hz, they don’t quite have the same sound as the ones recorded on the PS04.

I thought I would put together a playlist of the songs I recorded on these little units so you could hear what I mean. If you want to get one for yourself, they are still available on Amazon through 3rd party sellers. 



from WordPress http://ift.tt/2wtMwFS
via IFTTT

Monday, September 18, 2017

Installing 64 Bit Linux on 32 Bit EFI Macbooks AKA Black Macbook

The 2007 and 2008 ‘Macbooks’ have 64 bit core2 duo processors in them, but still had a 32 bit EFI which is sorta like bios and is what is needed for the OS to boot for installation. However if you ever just tried to download the standard Ubuntu 64 bit ISO from their website, it won’t work.

This was a bit of an annoyance for me a while back and I ended up just going with 32 bit. However, as time went on, 32 bit was not going to cut the mustard anymore, mostly because of certain programs no longer offering 32 bit versions like Skype and Google Chrome. Chromium Browser however does still offer a 32 bit, but since I need skype, I had to upgrade.

I knew there had to be a way to do it, so after some sleuthing I found an old bug report that included little bit of c source code that when compiled and ran in the same directory as the 64 bit linux iso, it will ‘remaster’ the iso into one with 32 bit EFI booting capabilities.

I first re-installed my personal Macbook and it worked like a charm! Then I decided to pick up another of the same exact model macbook and do a video on it. Check it out above if you’re interested. If you’re interested in creating your own iso to install, see this post for details . This is a bit of an advanced method and you will need to compile from source.

or if you’d rather just download an Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS 64 that’ll boot on 32 bit EFI. I’ve created one you can get here.



from WordPress http://ift.tt/2f62Ktx
via IFTTT

Aquarian X-10 Most Affordable and Best Synthetic Drum Sticks

A few years ago, wooden drum sticks really started to dry out my hands. I was not about to use drum gloves, so I thought maybe by using a synthetic stick I could avoid the drying of my hands. After trying others in the past, I stumbled across the Aquarian X-10 graphite/nylon drum stick.

It was a little strange at first, but once you adjust to them, wood actually feels strange to me now. The drying out of my hands problem has stopped and I have still yet to actually break one of these sticks and still have the very first pair I ever bought 2 years ago!

I love these sticks and highly recommend them if you’re looking for a wood alternative. They’re also much more inexpensive than other synthetic sticks on the market. Get a pair here!



from WordPress http://ift.tt/2wqqi7w
via IFTTT